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A Few Business Reads from Our Twitter Feed

While the pay gap has narrowed since 1980, not much progress has been made in the last 15 years. Arguably, one reason for this is the lack of transparency around pay. Most of us don’t know how much our colleagues make, which makes it easier for companies to ignore the issue.

Walmart workers have pushed for the company to reveal the extent of pay gaps between men and women workers. In 2015, Cyndi Murray, a founding member of the non-profit worker advocacy group, Our Walmart, introduced a shareholder resolution to require Walmart to disclose any disparities in pay between male and female employees.

Women earn enough on their own to qualify for 1 percent status in just one of every 22 top-earning households, new research shows. The gap hasn't narrowed for at least 20 years. Cornell economist Francine Blau ... found “the gender pay gap declined much more slowly at the top of the wage distribution than at the middle or bottom and, by 2010, was noticeably higher at the top,” Blau said.

Something people tend to ignore about the high price of child care in the United States is that it’s not just a burden on individual families; it’s really a weight on our entire economy.

The drag is obvious if you look at how female employment has stalled in the U.S. compared with the rest of the globe since the early 1990s.

A recent study from the Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences found that high-performing women have one thing in common: they have a tight-knit circle of other women ... The study found that women with a tight female-dominated inner circle had a job placement level 2.5 times higher than women with a male-dominated inner circle. It’s more important than ever that we build these important relationships with other women.

It may be 2019, but this news from Congress might make that hard to believe. As of Feb. 11, the House of Representatives' Office Supply Store will stock tampons and other menstrual products, and representatives will be able to purchase these products with their Members' Representational Allowance (MRA). This news probably will surprise you in two ways: first, that House representatives have something called an "allowance," and second, that women representatives have been unable to purchase menstrual products at the supply store until now.